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playing a key role in managing israel's overt campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let get out on the stage the duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution the world cannot tolerate iran with a nuclear capability vali nasr and fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] vali nasr leads john hopkins school of international study, he is one of the world's top exerts in the political and social developments of iran. he is the author of two best- selling books. he sits on the state department's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're
israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let's get out on the stage the equally forbiddable duo who will be orging -- arguing. leading johns hopkins prestigious school. born in tehran one of the world's top experts on the political and social development of iran. and he's the author of two best selling books, the shia revival and democracy on the iran. served as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once ag
to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking with the palace. today is a day for israelis to make a choice about their next leaders. no political party has ever gained a majority in israeli elections. so there's expected to be a lot of postturing about what type of government there will be for israel over the next four years. my colleague looks at what is on the ballot box today. >> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu was cheery this morning as he arrives to vote. by the end of the day he will likely have something more to be chief about. the leader of the party is expected to come out on top and keep his job. but at jerusalem's main market the lack of suspense means there's little fever. they talk about israel being divided and disillusioned. most take it as a give than benjamin netanyahu will remain in office. >> if you ask me, nothing. no b.b., no nothing. >> security, never far from the minds of israelis is what many see as netanyahu's strength. but at least to
. researchers blamed a rise in temperature for what they call an unprecedented retreat. now come to israel, where talks are already underway about building a new coalition government. put they's ballot alliance led by benjamin netanyahu -- and left him in a substantially weaker position. there is a young, centrist party. we have this report from jerusalem. >> thrusting himself and his centrist party onto center stage. after a long night, about his probable role in the coalition government, a potential newcomer, he told the bbc before the election exactly what he stands for. >> somebody has to be the voice of the middle class. there is a dispute with the palestinians. we came into the political arena to become that voice. >> benjamin netanyahu is expected to bring him into a new, broad government. the government was weakened by yesterday's vote, but net non remains prime minister. he is being urged to put together as broad coalition as possible, reflecting the day-to- day concerns of the secular is really is. perhaps, some of the ultra- orthodox religious parties and recent governments. aft
in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could
israel and its almost jake movement hamas agreed a cease-fire in the gaza strip. more than 170 palestinians and six israelis died in the fighting. many were traumatized including children. >> reporter: one month into the cease-fire resentment against israel runs deep in gaza strip. militants are showing wreckage of a car in which a hamas commander was killed during an air strike. they are also displaying pictures of women and children who were killed or injured in the violence. >> translator: this exhibition is meant to show the barbaric action of israel against women and children. >> reporter: hamas leaders have presented the cease-fire as a concession imposed on israel. tens of thousands of their supporters gathered to celebrate in early december. >> translator: the armed struggle against israel is our path to freedom. >> reporter: a new perfume called m-75 has hit the stands selling more than 2,000 bottles. it's named after the rockets fired by militants against israeli citizens. >> translator: i'm proud that our rockets can target israel in naming a perfume after them was a
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> fulfilling a need in north eastern japan. a woman in one tsunami-hit town opens a hotel so reconstruction crews can commute less and work more. we'll tell you why she put it on wheels. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." people who watch north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in the pyongyang are showing defiance. foreign ministry representatives issued a statement condemning the resolution as an attempt to deprive north korea of its right to launch a satellite for peaceful purp
of those. ashley: economic growth israel seems to be slowing down, so it is being done to turn it around especially with the election on the way and turmoil in the region? coming up, israel's minister of finance. he just had a meeting with treasury secretary tim geithner. it'll be interesting to see what he had to say. sandra: and liz claman live in las vegas getting us a glimpse of tomorrow's tech today. liz: how many of you all out there watching watch youtube videos and say i have to show that to someone? i want to show it on my television right now. panasonic with a new feature that they absolutely believe you will dump your current tv for and by panasonic. youtube to your tv. he will show it to us and it is something he absolutely feels can change behavior for television owners. we will show it to you coming up. over at panasonic. back to you. sandra: we look forward to that. shibani joshi is also at the big show in vegas and she will join us in about 15 minutes with the ceo of qualcomm, find out where he sees mobile technology heading and should know his products are in the most co
to say the pro-israel lobby which is a very diverse collection of organizations. some of them with very different motives. what got me really wasn't so much the adjective, although i found the adjective odd, it was the verb, intimidates. chuck hagel for 12 years was a senator from the state of nebraska. i looked it up. there are about 6,100 jews in the state of nebraska. i can imagine many lobbies that might have intimidated hagel when he was in the senate. the ethanol lobby, for example, the farm lobby, various other kinds of lobbies. the nra, the pro-life lobby and so on. it's hard to see how he levels a charge that this lobby intimidates people. now, are there pro-israel groups that are lobbying on behalf of israel? absolutely. are there dozens, if not hundreds of lobbies in washington operating in the same way all the time. so, this peculiar charge that this particular jewish lobby intimidates senators was something i found very disturbing and, obviously, not alone in this view. >> but you have writing in the "times" essentially about your column. it is bullying and name calling to
in that part of the world, israel. lou: the reason we continue to fund this government, to, to continue the policies of which egypt is simply a part, libya as well, the distance from which we have remained from events in syria, without a clear-cut policy, what are your thoughts? >> well, the syrian situation has now become much more serious simply because we now have evidence that the assad regime is moving the precursors and chemical agents to places we may not be able to deal with. nato took a look at it today, lou and said nato will do something about it. as you and i donate toe is toothless to do anything about it without the united states. and it could take upwards of above 50,000 troops to secure those chemical munitions, weapons of mass destruction that threaten not only the people inside syria but also the neighborhood to include turkey. thus the need for those, patriot missiles coming over. lou: right. are you surprised that we're sending patriot missiles, defense systems to, to the turks? >> no. in fact this has been hanging fire in brussels now for some months. the turks have
in 1981. and most recently, up until 2010, playing a key role in managing israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. ladies and gentlemen, major general retired adlin. [applause] now, let's get out on the stage the equal request formidable duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution, be it resolved the world cannot tolerate an iran with nuclear weapons capability. vali nasser and fareed zakaria. [applause] well, dean vali nasser leads john hopkins university's press contingentous school of advanced international studies, born in tehran, he's one of the world's top experts on the political and social developments of iran. and he's the author of two best-selling books, "the shi'a revival" and "democracy in iran." he sits on the state department's influential foreign affairs policy board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy
much for your thoughts today. appreciate your time. >> a big election coming up in israel, what it means for them and for us, straight ahead. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. before you begin an aspirin regimen. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. >> israel will hold crucial elections january 22. benjamin netanyahu facing perhaps the political fight of his life. itali bennett is a rise -- nast ali bennett is a rising force. and the conflict with the palestinians, with no sign of ending. what is the impact of the election on those of us here in the united states. we have the deputy speaker of the israeli knesset and a member of the liku
with the enemies of israel. >> he is trying to reestablish his right-wing credentials by supporting more building in jewish settlements of occupied palestinian land, which is seen illegal by international law. but even that is not enough to appease some of his former supporters on the right. -- >> one report said that there was a record surge in settlement expansion, not enough for those on the right to say that he is not tough enough for the palestinians. >> israel has to be strong on their negotiations and by being weak -- this is detrimental. >> others worry that his decision to form an alliance with the older-nationalist lieberman could hurt israel overseas. >> israel is going to be under the brunt of increased international criticism and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inaugurati
. in a few moments, a look at how the u.s. and israel should respond to the nuclear program. a forum on polling and the presidential election. a focus on the debate for aids and victims of hurricane sandy. >> i tend to flip over to the senate every now and again, especially if there is something important going on. coverage of the floor. the c-span has it. i even listen to c-span radio in my car sometimes if it is there. >> c-span, treated by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. now, a forum on iran's nuclear program. this debate includes a look at u.s. and israel policy in the middle east. ♪ >> i never heard such a stupid thing. [laughter] [indiscernible] >> then you have to come back and you are shaken up. >> i have yet to hear a serious argument from either of these two. no, no, you have had your say. >> you have got to say something. >> i am not prepared to sacrifice for some free market ideology. ♪ >> we are all in this. running a trade surplus unless we can find another to sell to. >> we remain on like japan. the
of defense towards the state of israel in our nation's history. not only has he said you should directly negotiate with iran, sanctions won't work, that israel must negotiate with hamas, an organization, terrorist group that lobs thousands of rockets into israel, he also was one of 12 senators who refused to sign a letter to the european union trying to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. >> reporter: he has had some controversial views within his party. now, on the democratic side today, we have heard from illinois senator dick durbin who had some kinder words about hagel in "state of the union." let's listen to that. >> chuck hagel was a republican senator from nebraska, a decorated veteran of the vietnam war, a person who has a resume that includes service on the foreign relations committee as well as the intelligence committee. yes, he is a serious candidate, if the president chooses to name him. >> reporter: so we know the president is planning to name him tomorrow. you heard senator durbin say a serious candidate. he may be a serious candidate but certainly going to be
of israel tonight. this, as the united states is providing a gift to egypt and muslim brotherhood member, president of e jupt, morsi. four f [laughter] 16 fighter jets left the country for egypt today part of a foreign aid package including 200 abe brame's tanks, and urged urged -- joining us now is andrew mccarthy, former federal prosecutor, convicted the blind shake, and he's also author ever the book "spring fever. illusion of islamic democracy," andrew, great to have you with us. start with, first, these developments. sending this aid to egypt at this point, and it is significant aid. there should be no misunderstanding about that. these have f-16s, 200abrhams's tanks, powerful weapons of war. >> a deal, lou, made back in 2010 with the mubarak regime committed to keeping the base with israel. it's now turned over to a regime that's committed to the destruction of israel, notwithstanding what they say, and a regime which is part of the global movement, the muslim brotherhood that the justice department proved in u.s. court in 2008 is committed to the, as they said, the elimination and
recently, in 2010, playing a key role in managing israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. ladies and gentlemen, major general retired amos yadler. [applause] now, let's get out on the stage the equally formidable duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution, be it resolved, the world cannot tolerate an iran with nuclear weapons capability, vali nasser and fareed zukaria. [applause] dean vali nasser leads john's hopkins university prestigious school of university international studies, born in tehran, one of the world's top experts on the political and social developments of iran and the author of two best-selling books on iran and sits on the state department's influential foreign affairs policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs ove
senator, just came out in support of chuck hagel. >> right. >> but there are a bunch of democratic pro-israel leaders like chuck schumer, bob casey, frank lautenberg, carl levin who have yet to weigh in and might have some concerns and bob menendez, the proor the anti-iran hawk. talk about their concerns right now. >> i have looked hard at the statements on the internet and the blogs and what he's said. chuck hagel said my first obligation is to the united states. i took an oath of office to defend the united states constitution. that doesn't mean he's anti-israeli. i have israeli friends, i support the israeli nation and defending themselves. however, break dot-dot, you know, you have to look at what's best for this nation first and how that's anti-semitic i don't know and that's the issue as far as i can tell regarding the rhetoric of hagel. >> john, another issue of particular of those like me on the left is hagel's comments that he made back in 1998 opposing president clinton's ambassador or nominee to be ambassador calling him openly aggressively gay and recently apologized for the comme
two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews, ma and israel, everything from the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to deal with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation. and again, whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in times and israel. so it's a unique perspective, looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> ambassador eizenstat, israel was one of a few foreign
union as they celebrate 50 years of friendship. >> israel going to the polls expecting to see benjamin netanyahu reelected. what's interesting a contentious talks on financial transactions. -- instituting a tax on financial transactions. >> we start with a celebration of a key strategic alliance between europe's two great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncom
is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud to be a prime minister and i thank you for giving me the opportunity for a third time to leave the state of israel. it is a big honor, but also a big responsibility. the election gives us an opportunity to make changes that the people of israel require. >> us take a closer look at the leading parties and were the standouts -- let's take a closer look at the lee present where they stand now. -- let's take a look at him the leading parties and where they are now. a surprise newcomer has made the biggest impact, winning the second largest share with 19. tom has more details on the coalition options. >> newton yahoo! post jaundice to call on his allies on the challengeetanyahu's now is to call and his allies on the right and the party that says the settlements in the west bank are getting too many resources at the expense of the poorer parts of the
policy record. >> his views with regard to israel, for example, and iran and all the other positions that he's taken over the years will be, you know, i think very much a matter of discussion during the confirmation process. >> so you're not predicting smooth sailing for chuck hagel? >> i think it will be a lot of tough questions of senator hagel, but he'll be treated fairly by republican s in the senate. >> quite frankly, chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking i believe on most issues regarding foreign policy. i expect the president to nominate people different than i would think. i'm going to vote for senator kerry. i don't agree with him a lot, but i think he's very much in the mainstream of thought. chuck hagel, if confirmed to be secretary of defense, would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense toward the state of israel in our nation's history. he has long severed his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination by the president to all of us who are supportive of israel. >> lindsey graham is saying that chuck hagel is out of the mainstrea
. some others have issues with what he said about israel. also, he started out as a supporter of the iraq war. then, he flipped on that. eventually, he came out against the troop. he also called the defense budget bloated. some question that he would be too tough on military spending. that is the next fight in washington. that deal puts off what is known as the soap quester. tte automatic spending cuts. but those cuts off for two months. congress is now going to wrestle with how exactly to replace those cuts, slow down those cuts or change those cuts. there are a number of republicans who have concerns over the former senator's record. a number of these issues have come up. we are not quite getting a firm read yet on exactly how it shakes out. there are concerns. back to you. lori: thank you. i wonder what the vegas odds are. so interesting that hagel has most of the opposition from other republican senators. agreeing to a deal with the government. a case-by-case review of foreclosures. how consumers may benefit. melissa: we will tell you when and how much it will cost you at the post off
to the israel lobby, he has come under fire from the left, or some -- anti-gay comments, perceived that way by a lot of people. does that make a potential confirmation battle even more difficult for him. >> you are killed by a thousand cuts, politically, or businesswise. obviously, you pointed out two or three cuts, if there will be more, it will be difficult. it will be a difficult nomination to be confirmed. but we will have to wait and see. i can't predict, as i said. but obviously, it will be probably some people say, tough going. >> he has a reputation, correct me if i am wrong, as an iconoclast. some have said the controversial comments may be him pushing the envelope of outside-the-box thinking. is that a rationalization for the comments he has made? >> probably so. you have to remember he is a combat veteran. he was in the reagan cabinet. he was a deputy secretary of veterans afairks i believe. he -- affairs, i believe. he has been a two-term senator. served on the intelligence committee with me. he served on the banking committee. he has been around. he understands the system. will
cameron said today. >> think you both for being on "gmt." israel, negotiations have begun to form a new coalition government after benjamin netanyahu failed to win an outcry majority in tuesday's general election. the alliance ended the day with fewer seats in parliament, losing around one quarter, but remaining the largest group. the centrist party was the surprise of the night. katya? >> benjamin netanyahu certainly got a bloody nose in those elections yesterday, his pre- election slogan, strong leader for strong israel, rings rather hollow. clearly many israelis did not like his leadership style, many felt he was too arrogant and out of touch and they shouted loudly for change. that will what impact the domestic policy. one out of four people in this country are living in poverty. it will also affect how they move forward on the crisis around the iranian nuclear program and the israeli palestinian crisis, whether they will move towards restarting long stalled peace talks. you can see the signal -- the city walls behind me there. the political makeup of the future coalition government
israel or other things we are better able to effect that and negate if we are participating. and then if we cease to pay the dues and so forth to take a different attitude than we see we sort of lose the opportunity to protect our friends which we want to have the are getting close to the line that would be very damaging if there were any effort to take israel for instance or any other country, if there is any effort to try to invoke other power that is the kind of unilateral action that we would feel very, very strongly against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not he
with israel. he says israel is ignoring the palestinian issue because it does not threaten their security. >> attempts to put the \ palestinians down and restrict their movement. all of this is not costing them much. >> one party on the right that is talking about the occupation, its leader, says he will propose that israel gets 60% of the west bank. >> he is expected to win the election. >> he can get israelis whatever they want without any threat. they can do whatever they want with total impunity. >> they are divided by the separation wall. some people believe that is why the occupation is not an election issue. >> they do not have to think about dealing with it because they have the army taking care of it. >> while israel prepares for the election, it controls the larger palestinians in the occupied territories. that is one issue politicians believe -- >> the slightest promises the government is not committing to reform. >> they say they are praying for stability. the muslim brotherhood is boycotting the does the government refuses to change a law they say is unconstitutional because
to, or is it about what he has said or what they believe he may believe about israel and iran? >> my sense is that it's mostly about israel and iran and that they believe that as secretary of defense who says the kinds of things he says, not so much -- not exclusively the policy positions. but one of the reasons people have liked chuck hagel over the years, a lot of reasons reporters like him and his supporters like him is he's a pretty free-speaking guy. he's iconoclastic. he's willing to say things and think about things that is outside not just party orthodoxy but outside what the mainstream foreign policy establishment thinks and that for a lot of republicans to do that on israel, to do that on iran, for someone who's going to be running the pentagon i think they find that alarming. and there's other things. they resent him because he said nice things about the president. they resent him because he endorsed bob kerrey for senate. >> rose: and was against the iraq war. >> there's all those issues. >> rose: did the president have any choice after he floated the name because of what
. and it has to do with there ran and the nuclear threat to israel. and the position germany was taking relative to that end i was questioning where they might be should there be a real threat or attack. of course you know that's not what we would -- the public would want us to do, but he said given the holocaust we have no choice. to be fair. we cannot stand by and let another holocaust he plays. so those decades of remorse until over the holocaust still dictates policy relative to support for israel, even though the public now decades on says vitamin e to do to do that again? and do we want to get mixed up and not? so that's kind of a unique dynamic that exists in that regard. but it's somewhat of a tenuous relationship. i spent a lot of time with the israeli ambassador, who spent a lot of time at the germans relative to german policy towards israel and a whole number of ways. so anything short of direct threat or attack on israel, dispenses favors we wish we could get this resolved and we wish israel would be much more flex will relative to the west bank and relative to the palestini
scandal surrounding the senator. it's all unconfirmed but the potential legal fallout is huge. >>> israel takes no chances. the air force launches two air strikes in syria preventing the assad regime from transporting chemicals and weapons of mass destruction to hezbollah. if the red line is crossed israel will attack again. we cover it all. "the kudlow report" begins now. first up we learned today the fourth quarter gdp fell slightly, much to everybody's surprise. so the white house is blaming republicans for the fiscal tax cliff and the spending sequester which i think is hilarious. they invented the sequester. we have had tax, spend and regulate policies for four years. why not try something different. let's talk about it with our powerhouse panel. jared bernstein, center on budget and policy priorities. senior fellow. doug holtz-ekin, peter suderman and james freeman, assistant editor for the wall street journal. james, i'm amoused right off the top. team obama starts attacking republicans first of all for the budget cutting sequester which they invented. second of all, for the fiscal
what happened at the the honduras. -- in honduras. we move to the middle east where israel has been concerned. whether they admit oit pubicly olicly or not. there were more focused on the palestinian issue but as the biggest issue in the middle east. iran, the people took to the streets as the defense of the principles we say we stand for and the president says we will not interfere in their sovereignty. that demoralized opposition. north korea announced they are developing in weapon that can reach united states. -- a weapon that can reach the united states. i think the bush administration was wrong to remove north korea from the list of states alters of terrorism. -- sponsors of terrorism. i hope we will reverse that. china and the conflict going on throughout the region during -- region. china is increasingly aggressive about their territorial claims. in their neighbors are looking to the united states as a counterbalance. a -- if the sequester goes through, what are we going to pivot with? these are the fundamental issues we face. as you sit with the president and help him form a
. it happened just outside damascus and marked the first attack by israel against syrian targets in some five years. syrian state tv insisted the air strike hit a military research site, not a weapons convoy. >>> "the new york times," chinese hackers have spent months infiltrating the computer systems and trying to gain access to reporter and staffers' information. this according to a new report from "the times." the attacks stem from an article published in october saying that the prime minister had accumulated billions of dollars through business deals. >>> "the los angeles times," wall street is feeling cautiously better about facebook this morning after a surprise fourth quarter. the social media company saw a 40% jump in revenue from the same time a year ago. largely due to successfully integrating advertising into their mobile apps. but the cost of investment in mobile dragged down facebook's profits. >>> and, of course, willie geist, the "daily news" is reporting sex-crazed sarge betted my new york pd hubby, laid to rest. so let's go to "politico" now. >> sounds good. joining us now, t
is coming to us out of israel where there are reports of an explosion in a car, and that has happened near the israeli defense ministry in televisa. this is according to the afp news agent -- news agency. an explosion of a car near the defense ministry. more as it becomes available to us. that weather has stopped a group of iranians who are being held in syria from heading home. the 48 men were released wednesday during a prisoner swap with the syrian government. they were expected to fly back thursday but the airplane could not take off because of a fierce storm hitting parts of the middle east. the iranian foreign minister is in egypt to discuss the conflict in syria. will also hold talks with president mohamed morsi. cold weather also making life even tougher for the thousands of syrians living in northern iraq. but despite the suffering and hardship, many refugees are finding it a place of opportunity. >> cold, tired, and waiting to register as refugees. they are the latest to arrive in the kurdish region of northern iraq some are too scared to talk. others are too young to understand
. many wonder if israel faces a deadlock after benjamin netanyahu lost so much ground to the left wing. while the israeli leader remains the country's political strongman, he knows he will have to engage. on wednesday, he gave his interpretation of the results. >> the public and israel wants me to continue to lead the country. it wants me to form a government that will lead three major changes -- a more equal sharing of the burden, affordable housing, and changes in the system of government. ben netanyahu now needs to work with the surprise winner of the election. the former tv journalist only founded his secular party last year. it is now the second strongest party. he wants his country to change course. >> israelis have said no to a policy of fear and hatred. they have said no to the division of israeli society into sections, tribes, or groups/interest. >> a total 12 parties have one seat in parliament -- have won seats in parliament, so there are alliance is possible. it may be some time before the formation of the next israeli parliament can be announced. >> polls have closed in ne
and neighbors like israel that are going to be profoundly affected by it. and so it's true sometimes that we don't just shoot from the hip. >> so richard haass, is this payback for, let's say, bill clinton doing such a great job for the obama campaign? >> we're speculating. >> people are still going back and saying the most important speech of that campaign was the one given by bill clinton, without question. that was the turning point for the -- i mean, i say turning point, those guys were pounding republicans who they were targeting from the very beginning, but that was really when america just, i think, turned. bill clinton captured the moment and defended the presidency. >> well, it's clear that bill clinton's support for the president helped his re-election both at the convention and beyond the convention. you're asking me to speculate on something i simply don't know anything about. >> well, that's what we do here. >> sorry. >> how long you been coming here? >> secretary of state leaving office, the president does a joint interview? >> i've never seen it before. the secretary of speech is
's relation with israel and jordan's relation with israel and turkey's relation with israel and you see populism and the willing tons pray play that is problematic for israel's perspective. >> rose: risk six is europe muddling through. >> muddling through and a much lower risk in europe than last year. >> rose: gdp growth less than one, two percent. >> yes but not falling apart. >> rose: okay. and euro stone remains euro zone remains stable? >> absolutely .. >> rose: east asia politics, what is that. >> east asia politics. >> rose: is that indonesia? >> basically it is the entire -- you think about the pivot, one of the most important policies we put in place the last few years is largely because across the asian continent, you have countries that are increasingly integrating economically towards a very strong china, but they maintain much stronger political and security relations with the united states. >> rose: which countries are we talkable about? >> we are talking a. >> talking about japan but also talking about vietnam, korea, thailand, even myanmar. >> rose: even burma. >> even b
with each other. egypt has supported and lived by the peace agreement with israel. israel has taken steps to begin the -- to begin to deal with the problem of security & nine. those are vital to us and to the security of israel. they have followed through on the promise to have an election. >> to have had an election. they had a constitutional process. there was another election. other countries elect somebody that you do not agree with this not give us permission to walk away from their election. >> this has been a problem with our policy for decades. we were in favor of radical jihad because they were the enemy of our enemy. i see support for serious rebels. >> and any of the arms sales that the united states has engaged in that part of the world, there is always a test applied with respect to a qualitative difference in any of those weapons with respect to israel's defensive security. we do not sell and will not sell weapons that may upset that qualitative balance. >> if we sell them to egypt, we have to give them to israel. why don't we not give weapons to israel's enemies. that would
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